Mind the Gap - reluctance from installers to use IP video

CCTV Today article by IP User Group Director encourages forward thinking.

At the end of the day, IP in security technology is here to stay. If you have your head firmly buried in the sand, then you do so at your own peril, as this technology will not go away; in time, you will find yourself out of date and that normally means out of work.


Reluctance from Installers

Installers can only spend so much time keeping up to date with new product developments. Of course, they have to stay abreast of technology and products to ensure they are not installing equipment that cannot be supported or maintained, but every visit to an exhibition, seminar or a manufacturer’s product demonstration takes time – time that could be spent generating income. So embracing a completely new technology, especially when the equipment they currently use is perfectly adequate for the majority of jobs in hand, is not top of their list of priorities.

Many potential integrators from outside of the industry are also reluctant to get involved; they see security as a low tech industry, with little financial appeal or relevance to what they do. Even many network managers don’t want security systems running over IP as they see their networks in danger of becoming overloaded. They are also not sure how they can get a decent return on investment, who should maintain the system and what are the legal implications of transmitting data across an IP network.


Need to work together

The IT, communications and security markets all have expertise in their respective fields: IT companies have considerable networking knowledge, but typically view security as a specialist area; communications companies have considerable skill in moving data around; security companies understand risk assessment and the most appropriate security solutions. But they need to work together if they are to successfully use IP for security purposes.

The IT, communications and security markets all have expertise in their respective fields: IT companies have considerable networking knowledge, but typically view security as a specialist area; communications companies have considerable skill in moving data around; security companies understand risk assessment and the most appropriate security solutions. But they need to work together if they are to successfully use IP for security purposes.
The IP UserGroup brings these parties together, providing direct access to experts and consultants in IP-related technologies, thus addressing the technical barriers. It helps to educate, inform and enlighten the security market and end users as to the benefits of IP. And the benefits really are considerable.