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How Business Intelligence Becomes an Eco-Research Tool

As environmental regulations increase, industrialization’s effects stretch further and ecological scientists grasp for new ways to collect vital data, some parties are all reaching for the same thing: business intelligence.

How Business Intelligence Becomes an Eco-Research Tool

Scientists in Australia's Rainforests and California's Beaches Use Business Analysis to Collect Data and Save the Ecosystem

As environmental regulations increase, industrialization’s effects stretch further and ecological scientists grasp for new ways to collect vital data, some parties are all reaching for the same thing: business intelligence.

Chris Lane, General Manager and Head of Research and Development for CoastalCOMS, has been enabling enterprises to use business intelligence to collect data and perform detailed analysis on beach erosion in California, as well as to monitor water salinity and root formations in the Logan River in Australia and animal activity in the Daintree Rainforest. CoastalCOMS is an Australian provider of cloud-hosted video and asset management services, which is moving gradually from security to “observation systems,” Lane says.

“These installations are bigger than just video and images. We’re combining data from many different sources to make intelligent decisions. We’re finding that a log of organizations going from analog to digital systems want an increase in productivity off of the infrastructure that they have,” he says. “They can build fantastic models of what is supposed to happen in the event of an incident, but they still have to verify the reaction through observation.”

That’s where triggered surveillance and integrated sensors come into play.

At the Daintree Rainforest, James Cook University researchers collect a massive amount of information and live sensor data, monitoring flora, fauna and climate throughout the canopy. By feeding the observation data through a Milestone VMS platform, the researchers can access live sensor monitoring and manual observations in an archive, which can be fused with live video and audio being streamed into the database.

Read the full article on the Security Magazine website.